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Greg's Meats

Friday, November 11, 2011

BILL'S BITS

FARM TRACTORS THAT I GREW UP WITH - The first tractor that I remember about was the F-12 Farmal tractor.  I mentioned this tractor in an earlier story about the time when we bought it.  It had the steel wheels and steel lugs on them and you could not drive them on roadways. In our neighborhood, the tractor of choice tended to be the John Deer.  I always liked their sound when running.  It was putt, putt, and when they ran faster, the putt, putt, went faster also.  The sound that I described was due to the fact that the J. D. only had two pistons, but they were very large compared to the regular four cylinder engines on other tractors.

There were tractors named Alls Chalmer's, Case, Massey Furgeson, International and later, Fordson. Our neighbor had a great big tractor called a "Huber." It was primarily used to run the threshing machine and do heavy plowing in the Fall and Spring. The International or Farmal had various sizes of tractors.  The real workhorse was usually the Farmal M and/or Super M. The model H was used for lighter work.

Each particular brand of tractor had its own speciality and the type of fieldwork that they could handle.  Some would be used for plowing the fields in the Fall or Spring, while others might be used in lighter work like pulling hay wagons or mowing Alfalfa and then raking it later to get ready to pitch into a hayrack or to be baled.

Owning a tractor was similar to owning a car.  Each owner had a particular reason for owning that vehicle or tractor based on their own likes or dislikes and they were
very loyal to their car or tractor. I probably missed some tractor's name's, so if anyone knows of others, let me know and I will mention them in another column. Our second and only other tractor was a Ford tractor and was bought in about 1950. Anyway you "cut it",  driving tractor was hard, dirty work, but it was a "far cry" from the horse powered days and the rest is history, as they say.

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